2014-15: The Year of the Maker in MBUSD

2014-15: The Year of the Maker in MBUSD
Students are the core of all of our efforts in the Manhattan Beach Unified School District. The 2014-15 school year has been a year of significant accomplishments for MBUSD students and staff, yet we remain steadfast in our determination to engage in continuous improvement. To provide MBUSD students with the 21st century skills they need to be successful in the world into which they will graduate, we are making sure that all of our students are at the center of our instructional improvements, our facility improvements and our plans for the future.
Making it Happen! On March 31st of this year, we cut the ribbon to celebrate the completion of our construction project at Mira Costa High School. We turned old classrooms into new classrooms. We built a new math/science building filled with state of the art laboratories where our students make science happen. We created new music rooms where our GRAMMY-winning student musicians create works of art every day. We now have a beautiful small theater where we can host 300 people for speaking and performing events. And in the middle of it all, we made a huge new collegiate-style quad where our students can enjoy the outdoors each and every day. And all of it was on time and on budget.
Making the Student the Center of Instruction! Our teachers have participated in and helped to lead five full days of district wide professional development this year. Our focus has been entirely on making classrooms places where students are doing, making, problem solving, thinking, and creating. I see it in our elementary classrooms, where teachers serve as coaches and mentors to students as they work to improve their reading, writing and math skills. I see it in our middle schools where our amazing science teachers offer hands-on science lessons where students can make their own meaning. I see it in our high school where students lead seminar sessions, direct and produce video production programming, and debate in our internationally acclaimed Model United Nations Program. MBUSD students are increasingly spending their time communicating, collaborating, creating and critically thinking.
Making Makers! One of the big movements in our country is the “Maker Movement.” It is happening in MBUSD, as all of our elementary schools have parent-led MakerSpace programs. Our students are creating robots, machines and inventions. We see it in our middle school with our Fab Lab Program, where students are creating using 3D printing and much more. We see it in our high school with our new Robotics program. All of these programs are rich in technology. Making gives students the opportunity to demonstrate their technical knowledge and creativity as well as their habits such as perseverance and resourcefulness.
Making the Grade! Our students, teachers and programs have received so many recognitions this year. As I mentioned earlier, our music program was named by the GRAMMY Foundation as one of the top programs in the nation. Both MBMS and Mira Costa High School received Gold Ribbon School awards this year. For the second year in a row, a teacher from our small school district has been named as a California Teacher of the Year. Congratulations to Maggie Mabery and Michael Hayden, the 2015 and 2014 California Teachers of the Year!Congratulations to Mr. John Jackson, the California Middle School Principal of the Year! And congratulations to all of us for helping conserve our planet. The state of California named MBUSD as a Green Ribbon District, because of our exemplary sustainability practices.
Making Plans for the Future! As our Mira Costa Construction Program is complete, we have turned our attention to the future. We are seeking to understand the needs of all our schools in terms of facilities that will serve the students for decades to come. How can our needs also serve members of our community? How should we upgrade our campuses and facilities? On July 15, the Board will adopt a Master Facilities Plan that will give us a roadmap to address our needs for the future.
Making a Difference! By investing in our students, our staff and our facilities, we are transforming great schools into extraordinary 21st century learning environments, where learning is student-centered and authentic. MBUSD is making a difference for our current and future students by providing them with the knowledge and skills they need to be successful in college, career and life. I am so grateful for all our teachers, staff, leaders, parents, community members and students who all work together to make a difference now and in the future.
Thank you, and have a great summer.
Mike Matthews
Michael D. Matthews, Ed.D.
Superintendent of Schools
Manhattan Beach Unified School District
Twitter: @drmdmatthews
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Reading: Screens or Paper?

We are a reading family.  It’s been that way since the words of Goodnight Moon and The Big Red Barn echoed through the house as our children were young.  One of my favorite memories of reading is in 2007, when the last Harry Potter book came out.  My son Ryan could not wait.  He was, after all, a classmate of Harry Potter.  He and Harry were almost the same age as Harry went through Hogwarts and Ryan went through Malibu High School.  Ryan turned me on to Harry Potter after I witnessed him read the first book for the fourth time.  “What is this book you keep reading?”  I asked.  “Only the greatest book every written about the greatest wizard ever,”answered my son.  I read it and was hooked too.
We were on vacation in Arkansas when the last Harry Potter book came out.  We had a big day planned on the boat at Greers Ferry Lake.  But on this day, reading was going to be part of our lake experience.  We were in Wal-Mart at 6 AM on the day it came out, and Ryan started reading immediately in the back seat as we drove toward the lake.  He finished around 11:00 AM and handed the book to me.  I finished around 6:00 that evening, and we talked the rest of the night about the book.  Yes, it was a little odd that we had our noses in a book in the midst of heat and beauty, but we took breaks, water skiing and swimming throughout the day.  But to share a book, love a book, and talk about a book is one great example of a life well led.
Ryan on Greers Ferry
Since I received my first iPad on Father’s Day 2010, I have become a digital reader as well as a paper reader.  I believe there are advantages to both, but at this point, I primarily read digitally.  My consumption of books has doubled since I became a digital reader.  My consumption of information has increased multiple-fold.  OK I’ll say it, I love reading on my iPad.  It has been a game changer for me.  I get that it’s not for everybody.  My younger son is a 12 year-old who loves paper books and his digital to paper ratio is probably 1:10.  I don’t judge.  I do question why the heck he thinks that way, but I have let it go.  For now.  The bottom line is : we all have personal preferences.
Naomi Baron recently published an article in the Huffington Post, Why Reading on a Screen is Bad for Critical Thinking.  It is based on her Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World book.  It’s an aggressive title on a critical topic.  The world of digital reading is still relatively new, and we have much to learn.  We are absolutely correct to study and learn about it.
Sometimes, critical reading is not at all necessary.  When I am reading about the Dodgers, reading a thriller book, or reading my Twitter feed, I certainly do not need to read critically all of the time. Scanning, reading for understanding, and then moving on is perfect for digital reading.  I don’t think anyone would question that.
But when I read for deeper understanding, there are certain  actions I must take, whether it be digitally or with paper.  I cannot read for understanding without writing while I am doing it.  When I am reviewing a dissertation, or when I am reading a book on leadership or learning, I want to make sure that (1) I truly understand what is being stated, (2) I think about how that impacts my learning and my life and (3) I remember what is most important in that reading selection.
Sometimes I will print out the document, and go at it with a pen in hand.  I am underlining, circling, taking notes, writing questions and completely engaged with the text as I read it.  When complete, I scan the annotated document back in to my Evernote account to make sure I can access it at any time.  So even when I read paper, I am at my best when I can access it digitally.
But more often, I will use digital platforms that support highlighting and annotating.  Highlighting could not be easier digitally.  You have a multi-color highlight set with you at all times.  Annotating takes a little practice, but again, it works beautifully in the right platforms.  If I cannot highlight or annotate easily (like with the Kindle or PDF Express apps) then I cannot read closely using a digital device.  But if I can, and in 90% of the cases I can, then that is what I most often do.  
The biggest advantages for digital reading for me are that (1) I can access a massive amount of information on demand, and (2) I have access to everything I have ever read, the text, my highlights and my annotation, anywhere, anytime.  That to me is a dream come true and I love living that dream.
If E-reading had existed back in 2007, the story of reading the last Harry Potter would have been a little bit different.  We would not have had to go to the store.  We could have woken up and purchased it immediately.  We could both be reading at the same time, stopping to discuss as we read along.  We could have shared ideas, both finished by noon, and played together the rest of the day, intertwining our play with conversations of the half-blood prince.  It was still a great day, but it could have been even better.
The questions asked in Naomi Baron’s article are spot on.  I wish the title could have been: Challenges in Reading on a Screen When It Comes to Critical Thinking.  The point I will most certainly concede is that if you cannot stay focused on digital reading, and you treat reading an important book or piece like you treat your Twitter feed, then book reading is the way for you.  I believe it takes practice and discipline, and I believe that ‘mere mortals’ are more than capable of achieving that discipline.
I don’t judge either way.  I do have a strong personal preference, and I know the way the world is going.  If we don’t learn to read critically using digital devices, then we are going to be in trouble.  Let’s acknowledge the challenges, and find ways to address them successfully.
Thanks for reading,
Mike Matthews

On Advanced Placement and Weighting

For the first time ever, we implemented a weighting policy in our high school. Advanced Placement classes will receive an extra grade point when we compute a student’s GPA. Students and parents may think it will provide an advantage in college admissions, but it won’t. We already do quite well in that area, and no student has been harmed by a lack of weighting. It will help a very small minority of our students who are trying to receive financial aid from seven or eight colleges in our nation. I resent the policies in those colleges, but I cannot change them. So we are now weighting.
One of my concerns and a concern for counselors and teachers in our high school is that we do not want this new weighting policy to encourage students to take more Advanced Placement classes than they should. We have read research on this, and the research contends that weighting grades is a reward for students taking AP classes, not an incentive for them to take more AP classes. We all hope that is the case.
Allow me to give you some of my thoughts about AP classes and student stress. First of all, I am a fan of well-taught AP classes. I taught AP US History for eleven years, and I loved it. I considered it to be a thinking and writing course using US history as the content. I strongly believe that any student who wants to go to a four-year college should take at least oneAdvanced Placement class during their high school career. Advanced Placement is as close as you will get to college rigor and it will give students a feel for collegiate rigor. When taught well, AP classes go far beyond memorization, instead focusing on writing, analysis and problem-solving. Right now, 57% of our graduates take and pass at least one AP class and exam before graduating. While that is wonderful, I would like to see that number be more like 70% or 75%. That is the amount of students that we see going directly to four-year college.
On the other hand, one of the biggest concerns that our counselors and I have is students who overdo it with Advanced Placement classes. It’s hard to define what “overdoing it” means.Students have different abilities and some are able to tolerate more than others. Using my version of common sense, taking one Advanced Placement class a year is excellent, taking two Advanced Placement classes a year is considerable, and taking three is really the equivalent of taking a full college load while also taking high school courses and all the activities that go along with that. In my mind, taking three AP courses is extreme. We have students who take four and five. I believe that is unhealthy and unwise, but I know some of our students and parents insist upon it. We do not have any rules at this time to stop it, but I know our counselors discourage students from overdoing it. I applaud their efforts.
I encourage students to take Advanced Placement classes in the areas that they are passionate about. If you know you are going to pursue liberal arts, take your AP classes there.If you are leaning towards the sciences, take your AP classes there. Or you can take my advice to college students on which college courses to take – find the best teachers you can and take their courses. Great teachers can make anything interesting. Students should choose wisely. They are giving up some of their own time by taking too many. And I want students to have as much time as possible that they can call their own.
I have mentioned before my appreciation for Excellent Sheep, by William Deresiewicz (2015). He’s states, “We want kids with resilience, self-reliance, independence of spirit, genuine curiosity and creativity, and a willingness to take risks and make mistakes.” We should all encourage students to pursue their passions as much as possible while they are in school. What kind of passions am I talking about? Music, acting, arts, athletics, thinking, problem-solving, friendships, building anything, worthy causes, and any other great use of time. Our job as parents and educators is to help our students find and pursue those passions. We cannot do it for them. All we can do is encourage. And if they have no time of their own, there is no time to pursue those passions.
We will be analyzing our Advanced Placement numbers carefully. We will be watching in particular for new students taking at least one AP class. If that number increases, I will consider that a victory for all of the students and for the school. We will also stay vigilant in evaluating the number of students who are taking more than three advanced placement classes. If this number rises, I will consider it an unhealthy result of our weighting grades and we will have to consider how best to address that. In the meantime, let’s all encourage our students to find balance, and to find time they can call their own.
Thanks,
Mike Matthews
Michael D. Matthews, Ed.D.
Superintendent of Schools
Manhattan Beach Unified School District
Twitter: @drmdmatthews

My Thoughts on Common Core Math

One of the major focuses for improving instruction comes in Common Core math. Our district is in the midst of adopting new teaching methodologies for our math teachers aligned to meet the demands of the Eight Standards for Mathematical Practices and the new standards in each grade. In spite of the politics that sometimes exists around the Common Core, I believe that if one actually examines the practices and standards, there is nothing unusual or out of line. What you will see is that the expectations are high. I embrace those high standards for our students.
Compared to the rest of the world, adults and students in the United States are not very good at math. I believe one of the reasons for that is that we are often taught that there is one way and one way only to solve a problem, and either you understand it or you don’t. That is just not true. There are many ways to think about solving even the simplest of math problems. We are often taught how to solve a problem using a proven method. We can get the answer, but the meaning can escape us. Even if you can solve a math problem, it does not mean you understand it.
I have always liked math. In elementary school, Rose Ann Hansen and I regularly competed to finish first in the class in all of the 100-question multiplication quizzes. She was a fierce competitor. I can still recite the quadratic equation, though I have absolutely no idea how use it. My wife and I sometimes compete at estimating square roots to the nearest hundredth. We are pretty close, but the difference is, she truly understands math. I was even a math major for a while in college, including successfully taking all the calculus classes. I gave up after my linear algebra class, where I could solve the problems correctly, but I had absolutely no idea what I was doing! I was able to solve the problem the way I was told to solve the problem, but unable to understand anything about what I had accomplished other than getting the right answer. I was doing math, but not understanding math. Finishing first, memorizing, and following procedural directions have their place, but they have little to do with understanding math. If we are going to compete internationally, far more of us have to truly understand math. That’s where the Common Core Standards come in: they are far more about understanding the math.
Common Core math seeks to help students always understand “the math behind the math” and how to apply it in real life situations by spending more time on concepts than our previous standards did. When these higher expectations are applied in the classroom, students will see problems that can look very different from what we parents saw in school. It will look different when are trying to help students go beyond memorization, and towards understanding. Here is a 3-minute video describing what these problems may look like, and why we are trying to teach students that there are multiple ways to approach a complex math problem.
If you want more information, there are many informational resources at achieve.org.
My bottom line: The Common Core Standards in mathematics can help us to be a nation that is far better at truly understanding math. I am 100% in.
Mike Matthews
Michael D. Matthews, Ed.D.
Superintendent of Schools
Manhattan Beach Unified School District
Twitter: @drmdmatthews

Being a Law Student For a Day

I went with my son Ryan today to his Constitutional Law class in UOP’s McGeorge School of Law taught by Distinguished Professor Brian Landsberg.  The class was one hour and twenty minutes long and was fascinating on a number of levels.
First and foremost, the dominant style of instruction is Socratic.  This is the second class I have experienced at McGeorge, and as we all have heard, law students indeed have to be on their toes.  Ryan told me once that the idea of Socratic teaching is to push the student to think deeper and deeper until they get to a point where  they can no longer answer.  The point is not humiliation, but to witness thinking and to truly check for understanding.  Even if a student is answering for a long time, other students are listening because they know they may be called upon to build upon certain points.  Having seen it twice in action, I am a fan.
There’s a lot of talk in education literature about “flipping the classroom.”  Socratic teaching certainly is that, at least to a degree.  In this lesson, the professor probably had a fifty-fifty mix of lecture and Socratic questioning.  In the class I saw last year, it was almost entirely Socratic.  Students are expected to learn the facts at home or in the library, then expected to delve deeper in class.
I saw two instructional elements beyond Socratic teaching that struck me today .  One of my beliefs is that in elementary school, we pay much attention to how each student learns and to finding all ways possible to make sure each student learns to his/her maximum potential.  In college, much attention is paid to delivering the content that needs to be learned, with little concern for how much each student learns, other than assigning a grade to the teacher’s assessment of each student’s learning.  The continuum goes from elementary to college, with high school typically being more on the collegiate side of the spectrum, and middle school not being far behind.  I am generalizing of course, but that is my belief.  Much of our education reform efforts have been to help all of us to focus more and more on finding ways to ensure that each student learns.
What’s my point here?  I love seeing when innovations in teaching and learning that began in K-12 make their way into college.  Today, Professor Landsberg had a series of questions that were on a PowerPoint presentation.  I asked Ryan why he wasn’t writing the questions down, as I’m sure he will see some of them later.  (Ryan’s memory is pretty incredible – the entire amount of notes he’s taken in his life would not fill a 200 page spiral notebook.  He’s done OK, so I guess I should just admire it.  He took no notes in class today by the way, and I know he retained it all.)  Ryan told me that the professor posts all of his presentations online.  That is fantastic!  I know it seems like common sense, but it’s new, and it’s still not embraced by many.  When I was in college, students had their own not-so-clandestine-and-by-the-way-for-profit note taking services.  It was radical.  When I first taught high school history, my notes were gold.  Why would I give students the notes and my questions when that would make it so easy for them to ace the tests?  Seriously.  That was my logic.   Doh!  Our only goal should be to give students every possible way to make learning as easy as possible.   Having the notes totally accessible is one great way of doing that.
The second technique I saw was the use of response clickers in class.  On four occasions, Professor Landsberg asked students to select A, B, C, or D to a preselected question.  What is he doing?  Checking for understanding!  He has been focused on three or four students during the Socratic teaching, and this is his way to making sure the class at least has a good working understanding of one central point before he moves on.  The results come up (anonymously) and he can see that over 90% of the class gets the main point.  Then he can move on.  If the percentage were lower, he could go back and reteach.  Awesome.
RyanLawPic
Finally, it is powerful to see students dedicating time and effort to truly understand our Constitution, and looking at all of the ways that it impacts our nation.  The entire focus of today’s class focused on one tiny section of Article I, Section 8 of the US Constitution.  It can be a little dry, but it reminds me that our nation is built on an amazing document that has the full attention of some of the best and brightest in our nation and the world.  As it should be.
And that concludes my report on being a student in a law school class today.
Thanks for reading,
Mike Matthews
Post Note: Here is Ryan and the Law Review Leadership Team from McGeorge School of Law.  He was one of the editors.  He’s on the far left.
Ryan and his Law Review Team

One More Hill

My dad took up bicycling in the 1970s.  Biking with 10-speed bikes.  No one biked with 10-speed bikes back then!  I was a swimmer, so ever since I was ten years old, I was always in good enough shape to go for a thirty-mile bike ride.  So my Dad would take me.   We’d go on Saturday rides around the great state of Arkansas with other wackos who were part of the biking world back then.  I loved being with my dad, and I liked the bike riding.  But we often went past forty miles, and I will say, I was not always happy when we did.
I have great memories.
  • I remember coming into a country store around lunch time looking for a sandwich.  The store didn’t sell sandwiches, just groceries.  But the owner opened up a loaf of bread and a package of bologna and a bottle of mustard, and charged us for the portion that she used.  Pretty cool.
  • Our family of six (four kids – ages 16 to 11) went biking for three weeks in Ireland, camping half the time and staying in B&Bs half the time.  It was a lifetime experience that warrants its own set of stories.
  • The last time I took a big trip with my Dad was about 20 years ago, when the two of us went biking in the San Juan Islands.  It was a fantastic trip where we camped the entire time.  Once again, my Dad was in better shape than I, but he dragged me along.  That’s us below.
bikingsanjuandad
One of many memories of biking with my dad is one that occurred quite often.  We would be biking in the afternoon of an all-day ride, somewhere in the Ozarks.  The Ozarks are beautiful and certainly not as high or steep as the Rockies or Sierras.  But I will tell you, there is a lot of uphill.  I would be grinding up a hill and ready to take a break, when my dad would say, “Mike.  I promise you.  This is the last hill.”  There is something about hope that gives you strength when you did not think you had it.  I would plow to the top, only to see nothing but hills, hills and more hills on the road ahead.  I would say something angry to my dad, who would say something like, “I said that this is the last big hill.”  OK, it was a lie.  But you know what, it made me get up that hill.  I could have chosen to stop at that time (I’m not sure how I would have gotten home), but I always chose to go on.  Being pushed and pulled towards greatness is an essential ingredient of improving and achieving greatness.
San Juan Islands MDM
Peter Senge called it “Creative Tension.”  Liz Wiseman has her “Rubber Band Theory.”  Steven Covey had it in his goal setting and “saw sharpening” activities.  When we are being pushed to improve, we are at our best.  It’s why people have a personal trainer.  It’s why I swim in a master’s program.  I would be very happy swimming a mile in the pool at my own medium pace.  But for the last 15 months, I have been in a pool with people much faster than I am, where a coach pushes me to swim two miles at paces much faster than I want to.  You know what has happened?  I am stronger and faster.   I now look for the hills on my bike rides and I look forward to swimming difficult sets, because they are beautiful, they are challenging, they are different, and because they make me stronger.
I hope we as educators view things similarly.  Although it is comfortable to keep swimming the same evenly-paced mile or keep biking the same relatively flat and short path, we do our best when we push ourselves, or when we have colleagues or mentors who push us to try new things, or push to improve.  We are better teachers when we do not settle for most of the students learning the material, but we insist on doing what it takes to help all students to learn it.  We do better when we treat every lesson as a chance for greatness.  It is why I believe so much in professional development.  We are in the learning business.  If we as teachers are not constantly learning, we are serving our profession poorly. Believe me, I know that teaching is hard.  Teaching is a full time job without adding any time for professional development.  But so is being a doctor.  We have to make time for learning.  We have to push ourselves up the hill.  We are better teachers for it, and more importantly, our students gain tremendously.
And I would say it’s impossible to do it alone.  For me, throughout my life, my father, my mother, my mentors and my coaches have pushed me to being better today than I was yesterday.   And I love it.  And sometimes,when I think I cannot go on, I love that I still choose to believe it when someone says to me, “This is the last hill.”
Thanks for reading,
Mike Matthews
Michael D. Matthews, Ed.D.
Superintendent of Schools
Manhattan Beach Unified School District
Twitter: @drmdmatthews

Reading: Screens or Paper?

We are a reading family. It’s been that way since the words of Goodnight Moon and The Big Red Barn echoed through the house as our children were young. One of my favorite memories of reading is in 2007, when the last Harry Potter book came out. My son Ryan could not wait. He was, after all, a classmate of Harry Potter. He and Harry were almost the same age as Harry went through Hogwarts and Ryan went through Malibu High School. Ryan turned me on to Harry Potter after I witnessed him read the first book for the fourth time. “What is this book you keep reading?” I asked. “Only the greatest book every written about the greatest wizard ever,”answered my son. I read it and was hooked too.
We were on vacation in Arkansas when the last book came out. We had a big day planned on the boat at Greers Ferry Lake. But on this day, reading was going to be part of our lake experience. We were in Wal-Mart at 6 AM on the day it came out, and Ryan started reading immediately in the back seat as we drove toward the lake. He finished around 11:00 AM and handed the book to me. I finished around 6:00 that evening, and we talked the rest of the night about the book. Yes, it was a little odd that we had our noses in a book in the midst of heat and beauty, but we took breaks, water skiing and swimming throughout the day. But to share a book, love a book, and talk about a book is one great example of a life well led.
Since I received my first iPad on Father’s Day 2010, I have become a digital reader as well as a paper reader. I believe there are advantages to both, but at this point, I primarily read digitally. My consumption of books has doubled since I became a digital reader. My consumption of information has increased multiple-fold. OK I’ll say it, I love reading on my iPad. It has been a game changer for me. I get that it’s not for everybody. My younger son is a 12 year-old who loves paper books and his digital to paper ratio is probably 1:10. I don’t judge. I do question why the heck he thinks that way, but I have let it go. For now. The bottom line is : we all have personal preferences.
Naomi Baron recently published an article in the Huffington Post, Why Reading on a Screen is Bad for Critical Thinking. It is based on her Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World book. It’s an aggressive title on a critical topic. The world of digital reading is still relatively new, and we have much to learn. We are absolutely correct to study and learn about it.
Sometimes, critical reading is not at all necessary. When I am reading about the Dodgers, reading a thriller book, or reading my Twitter feed, I certainly do not need to read critically all of the time. Scanning, reading for understanding, and then moving on is perfect for digital reading. I don’t think anyone would question that.
But when I read for deeper understanding, there are certain actions I must take, whether it be digitally or with paper. I cannot read for understanding without writing while I am doing it. When I am reviewing a dissertation, or when I am reading a book on leadership or learning, I want to make sure that (1) I truly understand what is being stated, (2) I think about how that impacts my learning and my life and (3) I remember what is most important in that reading selection.
Sometimes I will print out the document, and go at it with a pen in hand. I am underlining, circling, taking notes, writing questions and completely engaged with the text as I read it. When complete, I scan the annotated document back in to my Evernote account to make sure I can access it at any time. So even when I read paper, I am at my best when I can access it digitally.
But more often, I will use digital platforms that support highlighting and annotating. Highlighting could not be easier digitally. You have a multi-color highlight set with you at all times. Annotating takes a little practice, but again, it works beautifully in the right platforms. If I cannot highlight or annotate easily (like with the Kindle or PDF Express apps) then I cannot read closely using a digital device. But if I can, and in 90% of the cases I can, then that is what I most often do.
The biggest advantages for digital reading for me are that (1) I can access a massive amount of information on demand, and (2) I have access to everything I have ever read, the text, my highlights and my annotation, anywhere,anytime. That to me is a dream come true and I love living that dream.
If E-reading had existed back in 2007, the story of reading the last Harry Potter would have been a little bit different. We would not have had to go to the store. We could have woken up and purchased it immediately. We could both be reading at the same time, stopping to discuss as we read along. We could have shared ideas, both finished by noon, and played together the rest of the day, intertwining our play with conversations of the half-blood prince. It was still a great day, but it could have been even better.
The questions asked in Naomi Baron’s article are spot on. I wish the title could have been:Challenges in Reading on a Screen When It Comes to Critical Thinking. The point I will most certainly concede is that if you cannot stay focused on digital reading, and you treat reading an important book or piece like you treat your Twitter feed, then book reading is the way for you. I believe it takes practice and discipline, and I believe that ‘mere mortals’ are more than capable of achieving that discipline.
I don’t judge either way. I do have a strong personal preference, and I know the way the world is going. If we don’t learn to read critically using digital devices, then we are going to be in trouble. Let’s acknowledge the challenges, and find ways to address them successfully.
Thanks for reading,
Mike Matthews